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Contact information about the submitter of this metadata record:
Author list: Maggie Davis, Matt Langholtz, Laurence Eaton, Chad Hellwinkel
Who should be contacted with questions relating to the data? (Principal investigator or primary developer of data product): Maggie Davis, davismr@ornl.gov

Organization:
DOE
Author(s):
Maggie Davis , Matt Langholtz , Laurence Eaton , Chad Hellwinkel
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

With the goal of understanding environmental effects of a growing bioeconomy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, and U.S. Forest Service research laboratories, together with academic and industry collaborators, undertook a study to estimate environmental effects of potential biomass production scenarios in the United States, with an emphasis on agricultural and forest biomass. Potential effects investigated include changes in soil organic carbon (SOC), greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water quality and quantity, air emissions, and biodiversity.

Author(s):
R. A. Efroymson , M. H. Langholtz , E. Johnson , B. J. Stokes
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

The Federal Activities Report on the Bioeconomy has been prepared to emphasize the significant potential for an even stronger U.S. bioeconomy through the production and use of biofuels, bioproducts, and biopower. Bioeconomy activities have already touched on the interests of many federal agencies and offices. This report is intended to educate the public on the wide-ranging, federally funded activities that are helping to bolster the bioeconomy.

Author(s):
The Biomass Research and Development (R&D) Board
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

This paper analyzes the rural Chinese biomass supply system and models supply chain operations according to U.S. concepts of logistical unit operations: harvest and collection, storage, transportation, preprocessing, and handling and queuing. In this paper, we quantify the logistics cost of corn stover and sweet sorghum in China under different scenarios. We analyze three scenarios of corn stover logistics from northeast China and three scenarios of sweet sorghum stalks logistics from Inner Mongolia in China.

Author(s):
Lantian Ren, Kara Cafferty, Mohammad Ron, Jacob Jacobson, Guanghui Xie, Leslie Ovard, and Christopher Wright
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Harvesting of corn stover (plant residues) for cellulosic ethanol production must be balanced with the requirement for returning plant residues to agricultural fields to maintain soil structure, fertility, crop protection, and other ecosystem services. High rates of corn stover removal can be associated with decreased soil organic matter (SOM) quantity and quality and increased highly erodible soil aggregate fractions.

Author(s):
R. Michael Lehman , Thomas F. Ducey , Virginia L. Jin , Veronica Acosta-Martinez , Carla M. Ahlschwede , Elizabeth S. Jeske , Rhae A. Drijber , Keri B. Cantrell , James R. Frederick , Darci M. Fink , Shannon L. Osborne , Jeff M. Novak , Jane M. F. Johnson , Gary E. Varvel

In-field measurements of direct soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions provide critical data for quantifying the net energy efficiency and economic feasibility of crop residue-based bioenergy production systems. A major challenge to such assessments has been the paucity of field studies addressing the effects of crop residue removal and associated best practices for soil management (i.e., conservation tillage) on soil emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), and methane (CH4).

Author(s):
Virginia L. Jin , John M. Baker , Jane M.-F. Johnson , Douglas L. Karlen , R. Michael Lehman , Shannon L. Osborne , Thomas J. Sauer , Diane E. Stott , Gary E. Varvel , Rodney T. Venterea , Marty R. Schmer , Brian J. Wienhold

Harvesting crop residue needs to be managed to protect agroecosystem health and productivity. DAYCENT, a process-based modeling tool, may be suited to accommodate region-specific factors and provide regional predictions for a broad array of agroecosystem impacts associated with corn stover harvest. Grain yield, soil C, and N2O emission data collected at Corn Stover Regional Partnership experimental sites were used to test DAYCENT performance modeling the impacts of corn stover removal.

Author(s):
Eleanor E. Campbell , Jane M. F. Johnson , Virginia L. Jin , R. Michael Lehman , Shannon L. Osborne , Gary E. Varvel , Keith Paustian

This paper describes the current Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) as of August 2013, a system dynamics model developed under the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The model is the result of a multi-year project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). It is a tool designed to better understand biofuels policy as it impacts the development of the supply chain for biofuels in the United States.

Author(s):
Peterson, Steve

Corn stover is targeted as a potential non-food bioenergy feedstock, especially in the Midwest United States.  Three parallel experiments on adjacent fields, one is managed without tillage since 1995, a second experiment is managed without tillage since 2005, and the third is managed with chisel plowing since 2005.  The residue removal treatments are the same in all experiments, with 0, 50%, 75% and 100% of the rows from plots in the corn phase of the rotation harvested. In 2008, the 75% stover removal was changed to cob removal.

Author(s):
Jane M. Johnson , Nancy Barbour

Biofuels are promoted in the United States through aggressive legislation, as one part of an overall strategy to lessen dependence on imported energy as well as to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases (Office of the Biomass Program and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, 2008). For example, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) mandates 36 billion gallons of renewable liquid transportation fuel in the U.S. marketplace by the year 2022 (U.S. Government, 2007).

Author(s):
Emily Newes, Daniel Inman, Brian Bush