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We propose a causal analysis framework to increase understanding of land-use change (LUC) and the reliability of LUC models. This health-sciences-inspired framework can be applied to determine probable causes of LUC in the context of bioenergy. Calculations of net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for LUC associated with biofuel production are critical in determining whether a fuel qualifies as a biofuel or advanced biofuel category under regional (EU), national (US, UK), and state (California) regulations.

Organization:
DOE
Author:
Efroymson RA , Kline KL , Angelsen A , Verburg PH , Dale VH , Langeveld JWA , McBride A
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Understanding the complex interactions among food security, bioenergy sustainability, and resource management requires a focus on specific contextual problems and opportunities. The United Nations’ 2030 Sustainable Development Goals place a high priority on food and energy security; bioenergy plays an important role in achieving both goals.

Organization:
DOE
Author:
Kline KL , Msangi S , Dale VH , Woods J , Souza G , Osseweijer P , Clancy J , Hilbert J , Mugera H , McDonnell P , Johnson F
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

HYSYS 8.8 file and PDF description for the process model developed in HYSYS v8.8 to co-process oxygenated biomass intermediates with petroleum vacuum gas oil (VGO) in a conventional petroleum hydrocracker. HYSYS has built-in hydrocracking/hydrotreating correlations for conventional petroleum feeds such as VGO but not for oxygenated species. The document walks through how the oxygenates were programmed into HYSYS and the simple reactions assigned to those species.

Author:
Mark Bearden
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Production of bioenergy from cellulosic sources is likely to increase due to mandates, tax incentives, and subsidies. However, unchecked growth in the bioenergy industry has the potential to adversely influence land use, biodiversity, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and water resources. It may have unintended environmental and socioeconomic consequences. Against this backdrop, it is important to develop standards and protocols that ensure sustainable bioenergy production, promote the benefits of biofuels, and avoid or minimize potential adverse outcomes.

Author:
Pralhad Burli , Pankaj Lal , Bernabas Wolde , Janaki Alavalapati

With the shift from petroleum-based to biomass-based economies, global biomass demand and trade is growing. This trend could become a threat to food security. Though rising concerns about sustainability aspects have led to the development of voluntary certification standards to ensure that biomass is sustainably produced, food security aspects are hardly addressed as practical criteria and indicators lack.

Author:
Anna Mohr , Tina Beuchelt , Rafaël Schneider , Detlef Virchow

Bioeconomy has gained political momentum since 2012 when the European Commission adopted the strategy “Innovating for Sustainable Growth: A Bioeconomy for Europe”. Assessing the environmental performance of different bioeconomy value chains (divided in three pillars: food and feed, bio-based products and bioenergy) is key to facilitate solid and evidence-based policy making.

Author:
Jorge Cristóbal , Cristina T. Matos , Jean-Philippe Aurambout , Simone Manfredi , Boyan Kavalov

A vibrant, resilient and productive agricultural sector is fundamental to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Bringing about such a transformation requires optimizing a range of agronomic, environmental and socioeconomic outcomes from agricultural systems – from crop yields, to biodiversity, to human nutrition. However, these outcomes are not independent of each other – they interact in both positive and negative ways, creating the potential for synergies and trade-offs.

Author:
Kanter DR , Musumba M , Wood SLR , Palm C , Antle J , Balvanera P , Dale VH , Havlik P , Kline KL , Scholes RJ , Thornton P , Tittonell P , Andelman S

The four-day Tour explored how innovations supported by government and industry are enabling the deployment of a more sustainable bioeconomy. The bioeconomy refers to the use of renewable biomass in place of fossil inputs such as coal and petroleum for production of products and services, including energy, plastics and chemicals. Because sustainability is aspirational and context-specific, during the Tour it was interpreted as being
characteristic of activities that maintain or enhance environmental, social, and economic benefits relative to the status quo.

Author:
Dale VH , Parish ES , Kline KL

We propose a causal analysis framework to increase understanding of land-use change (LUC) and the reliability of LUC models. This health-sciences-inspired framework can be applied to determine probable causes of LUC in the context of bioenergy. Calculations of net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for LUC associated with biofuel production are critical in determining whether a fuel qualifies as a biofuel or advanced biofuel category under regional (EU), national (US, UK), and state (California) regulations.

Author:
Efroymson RA , Kline KL , Angelsen A , Verburg PH , Dale VH , Langeveld JWA , McBride A
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.