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thermochemical

This publication provides the summary and conclusions from the workshop ‘Thermal Pre-treatment of Biomass for Large-scale Applications’ held in conjunction with the meeting of the Executive Committee of IEA Bioenergy in York, United Kingdom, on 12 October 2010.

The purpose of the workshop was to provide perspectives on how to integrate large-scale bioenergy deployment with existing fuel logistics.

Bioenergy Category

A dry-grind ethanol from corn process analysis is performed. After defining a complete model of the process, a pinch technology analysis is carried out to optimise energy and water demands. The so-defined base case is then discussed in terms of production costs and process profitability. A detailed sensitivity analysis on the most important process and financial variables is carried out. The possibility to adopt different alternatives for heat and power generation combined to the process is evaluated.

Data Source
Chemical Engineering Research and Design
Contact Person
Alberto Bertucco
Author
Giada Franceschin

The important key technologies required for the successful biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol have been extensively reviewed. The biological process of ethanol fuel production utilizing lignocellulose as substrate requires: (1) delignification to liberate cellulose and hemicellulose from their complex with lignin, (2) depolymerization of the carbohydrate polymers (cellulose and hemicellulose) to produce free sugars, and (3) fermentation of mixed hexose and pentose sugars to produce ethanol. The development of the feasible biological delignification process should be possible if lignin-degrading microorganisms, their ecophysiological requirements, and optimal bioreactor design are effectively coordinated. Some thermophilic anaerobes and recently-developed recombinant bacteria have advantageous features for direct microbial conversion of cellulose to ethanol, i.e. the simultaneous depolymerization of cellulosic carbohydrate polymers with ethanol production. The new fermentation technology converting xylose to ethanol needs also to be developed to make the overall conversion process more cost-effective. The bioconversion process of lignocellulosics to ethanol could be successfully developed and optimized by aggressively applying the related novel science and technologies to solve the known key problems of conversion process.

Data Source
Journal of Biotechnology
Contact Person
Jeewon Lee
Author
Jeewon Lee
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