Literature + Algae + Billion Ton Report 2005 + Biomass Feedstock Cultivation + Energy Data Books + Land Use Impacts + Models and Applications + Switchgrass + New Feedstock Research

Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop

The Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted the workshop on Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Design on March 4-6 in partnership with Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories.

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Date Range: 
March 04 - March 06
Author: 
Bioenergy Technologies Office
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Microalgae Water Use and Costs

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A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a partial techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems.

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Contact Person: 
Andre Coleman
Contact Organization: 
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
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Agricultural Renewable Solid Fuels Data

All provided information is based on the Proximate Analysis testing for solid fuels in accordance with American Society for Testing and Materials(ASTM).

The compiled information should be used only as a general comparative guide for agricultural renewable fuels.

The evaluated agricultural renewable fuel groups include grains, crop residues, fibers, and agricultural processing co-products.

Agricultural products naturally contain variability which is dependent on geographical regions, grain/plant varieties, and seasonal changes.

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September 29
Author: 
AURI
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Empirical geographic modeling of switchgrass yields in the United States

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a perennial grass native to the United States that has been studied as a sustainable source of biomass fuel. Although many field-scale studies have examined the potential of this grass as a bioenergy crop, these studies have not been integrated. In this study, we present an empirical model for switchgrass yield and use this model to predict yield for the conterminous United States. We added environmental covariates to assembled yield data from field trials based on geographic location. We developed empirical models based on these data.

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Progress Toward Evaluating The Sustainability Of Switchgrass As A Bioenergy Crop Using The SWAT Model

Adding bioenergy to the U.S. energy portfolio requires long‐term profitability for bioenergy producers and
long‐term protection of affected ecosystems. In this study, we present steps along the path toward evaluating both sides of
the sustainability equation (production and environmental) for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) using the Soil and Water
Assessment Tool (SWAT). We modeled production of switchgrass and river flow using SWAT for current landscapes at a
regional scale. To quantify feedstock production, we compared lowland switchgrass yields simulated by SWAT with estimates

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Land-Use Change and Bioenergy: Report from the 2009 workshop

The U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program sponsored the Land-Use Change and Bioenergy workshop in Vonore, Tennessee, from May 11 to May 14, 2009. More than 50 experts from around the world gathered to review the state of the science, identify opportunities for collaboration, and prioritize next steps for the research and data needed to address key issues regarding the land-use effects of bioenergy policies. A key outcome of the workshop was the
identification of research areas that may improve our understanding of land-use change in a bioenergy context.

Author: 
ORNL
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The land use–climate change–energy nexus

Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered by both changing resource-management practices of humans and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource-extraction and land-management activitiesinvolve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes.

Author: 
Dale, Virginia
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Empirical geographic modeling of switchgrass yields in the United States

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a perennial grass native to the United States that has been studied as a sustainable source of biomass fuel. Although many field-scale studies have examined the potential of this grass as a bioenergy crop, these studies have not been integrated. In this study, we present an empirical model for switchgrass yield and use this model to predict yield for the conterminous United States. We added environmental covariates to assembled yield data from field trails based on geographic location. We developed empirical models based on these data.

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Use of SWAT model to evaluate the sustainability of switchgrass production at a national scale

As the US begins to integrate biomass crops and residues into its mix of energy feedstocks, tools are needed to measure the long-term sustainability of these feedstocks. Two aspects of sustainability are long-term potential for profitably producing energy and protection of ecosystems influenced by energy-related activities. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is an important model used in our efforts to quantify both aspects. To quantify potential feedstock production, we used SWAT to estimate switchgrass yields at a national scale.

Author: 
Baskaran, Latha
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Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale

The establishment of bioenergy crops will affect ecological processes and their interactions
and thus has an influence on ecosystem services provided by the lands on which these crops are grown.
The regional-scale effects of bioenergy choices on ecosystem services need special attention because they
often have been neglected yet can affect the ecological, social, and economic aspects of sustainability. A
regional-scale perspective provides the opportunity to maximize ecosystem services, particularly with

Author: 
Virginia Dale, Richard Lowrance
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