Literature + Algae + Billion Ton Report 2005 + Biomass Feedstock Cultivation + Energy Data Books + Land Use Impacts + Models and Applications + Switchgrass + New Feedstock Research

Empirical geographic modeling of switchgrass yields in the United States

Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a perennial grass native to the United States that has been studied as a sustainable source of biomass fuel. Although many field-scale studies have examined the potential of this grass as a bioenergy crop, these studies have not been integrated. In this study, we present an empirical model for switchgrass yield and use this model to predict yield for the conterminous United States. We added environmental covariates to assembled yield data from field trials based on geographic location. We developed empirical models based on these data.

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August 25
Author: 
Henrietta I. Jager
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Environmental Indicators of Biofuel Sustainability: What About Context

Indicators of the environmental sustainability of biofuel production, distribution, and use should be selected, measured, and interpreted with respect to the context in which they are used. The context of a sustainability assessment includes the purpose, the particular biofuel production and distribution system, policy conditions, stakeholder values, location, temporal influences, spatial scale, baselines, and reference scenarios.

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August 25
Author: 
R. A. Efroymson
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A landscape Perspective on Sustainability of Agricultural Systems

Agricultural sustainability considers the effects of farm activities on social, economic, and environmental conditions at local and regional scales.  Adoption of more sustainable agricultural practices entails defining sustainability, developing easily measured indicators of sustainability, moving toward integrated agricultural systems, and offering incentives or imposing regulations to affect farmer behavior.  Landscape ecology is an informative discipline in considering sustainability because it provides theory andmethods for dealing with spatial heterogeneity, scaling, integrat

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August 24
Author: 
Virginia H. Dale
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Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives.

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August 19
Author: 
Virginia H. Dale
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Selecting Metrics for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstocks

When we think about sustainable bioenergy feedstocks in the United States, we ask ourselves what we will grow, where we will grow it, and how much we will grow. We also must consider the local as well as the broad-scale implications. From the perspective of landscape ecology, we tend to look at the broader scales.  It is one of the big challenges of bioenergy, not just looking at what happens to the local farmer but thinking about broader implications. From a global perspective, we also need to ask the same questinos, how much, what type and where?

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August 19
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Use of the SWAT Model to Evaluate the Sustainability of Switchgrass Production at the National Scale

As the US begins to integrate biomass crops and residues into its mix of energy feedstocks, tools are needed to measure the long-term sustainability of these feedstocks. Two aspects of sustainability are long-term potential for profitably producing energy and protection of ecosystems influenced by energy-related activities.  The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is an important model used in our efforts to quantify both these aspects. To quantify potential feedstock production, we used SWAT to estimate switchgrass yields at a national scale.

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Author: 
Latha Baskaran
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Ecological Objectives can be achieved with wood-derived bioenergy

Peer-reviewed letter written in response to a March 11, 2015, letter to US EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy (http://bit.ly/1HsSaWf), in which the Ecological Society of America objected to EPA’s proposal that sustainably harvested woody biomass could reduce carbon emissions. Citing a November 2014 EPA memorandum (known as the McCabe memo; http://1.usa.gov/1zMeZf2), the Ecological Society letter argued that the EPA’s stance would undermine federal efforts to “deter rapid deforestation, lower carbon emissions, and mitigate the effects of global climate change”.

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August 06
Author: 
V. H. Dale
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Woody energy crops in the southeastern United States: Two centuries of practitioner experience

Forest industry experts were consulted on the potential for hardwood tree species to serve as feedstock for bioenergy in the southeastern United States. Hardwoods are of interest for bioenergy because of desirable physical qualities, genetic research advances, and growth

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June 01 - November 01
Author: 
Keith Kline
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Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs Workshop

The Bioenergy Technologies Office hosted two workshops on Incorporating Bioenergy into Sustainable Landscape Designs with Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories. The first workshop focused on forestry landscapes and was held in New Bern, NC, from March 4-6, 2014. The second workshop focused on agricultural landscapes and was held in Argonne, IL, from June 24-26, 2014. Landscape design offers a promising means for sustainably increasing bioenergy production while maintaining or enhancing other ecosystem services.

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Price Projections of Feedstocks for Biofuels and Biopower in the U.S.

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The economic availability of biomass resources is a critical component in evaluating the commercial
viability of biofuels. To evaluate projected farmgate prices and grower payments needed to procure 295
million dry Mg (325 million dry tons) of biomass in the U.S. by 2022, this research employs POLYSYS, an
economic model of the U.S. agriculture sector. A price-run simulation suggests that a farmgate price of
$58.42 Mg1 ($53.00 dry ton1) is needed to procure this supply, while a demand-run simulation

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July 07
Author: 
ORNL
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