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Conventional feedstock supply systems exist and have been developed for traditional agriculture and forestry systems. These conventional feedstock supply systems can be effective in high biomass-yielding areas (such as for corn stover in Iowa and plantation-grown pine trees in the southern United States), but they have their limits, particularly with respect to addressing feedstock quality and reducing feedstock supply risk to biorefineries. They also are limited in their ability to efficiently deliver energy crops. New logistics technologies and systems are needed to address these challenges and support a growing bioenergy industry.

The proposed solution put forth by the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office to address these challenges is Advanced Feedstock Supply Systems. The Advanced Feedstock Supply Systems incorporate densification, drying, and other preprocessing technologies to create a biomass commodity. A feature of these advanced systems is biomass preprocessing depots that format biomass in fairly close proximity to the location of production. However, validating assumptions used to develop these advanced systems is critical.

The Advanced Feedstock Supply System Validation Workshop gathered experts from industry, DOE offices, DOE-funded laboratories, and academia to discuss approaches to addressing challenges associated with an expanding bioenergy industry and assumptions used in the Advanced Feedstock Supply System. The workshop was sponsored by the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Contact Phone
Publication Year
Contact Email
erin.searcy@inl.gov
Contact Person
Erin Searcy
Contact Organization
Idaho National Laboratory
Bioenergy Category
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

ORNL Report ORNL/TM-2010-120.
The purpose of this study is to summarize the various barriers to more widespread distribution of biofuels through our common carrier fuel distribution system, which includes pipelines, barges and rail, fuel tankage, and distribution terminals, and with a special focus on biofuels, which may come into increased usage in the future. Addressing these barriers is necessary to allow the more widespread utilization and distribution of biofuels, in support of a renewable fuels standard and possible future low-carbon fuel standards. By identifying these barriers early, for fuels not currently in widespread use, they can be addressed in related research and development. These barriers can be classified into several categories, including operating practice, regulatory, technical, and acceptability barriers. Possible solutions to these issues are discussed, including compatibility evaluation, changes to biofuels, regulatory changes, and changes in the distribution system or distribution practices. No actual experimental research has been conducted in the writing of this report, but results are used to develop recommendations for future research and additional study as appropriate.

Contact Phone
Usage Policy
any
Publication Year
Contact Email
buntingbg@ornl.gov
Attachment
Data Source
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Contact Person
Bruce Bunting
Contact Organization
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Bioenergy Category
Author(s)
Bruce Bunting

This paper examines the impact of biofuel expansion on grain utilization and distribution at the state and cropping district level as most of grain producers and handlers are directly influenced by the local changes. We conducted a survey to understand the utilization and flows of corn, ethanol and its co-products, such as dried distillers grains (DDG) in Iowa. Results suggest that the rapidly expanding ethanol industry has a significant impact on corn utilization in Iowa. Comparing to the earlier survey results, ethanol plants drew a considerable amount of corn away from traditional destination markets, such as feeders or export markets. A major portion of corn supplies came from in-state sources, while the sales of Iowa ethanol and DDG were dominated by out-of-state buyers.

Contact Email
tyu1@utk.edu
Data Source
AgEcon Search/Southern Agricultural Economics Association
Contact Person
Yu, Tun-Hsiang (Edward)
Author(s)
Yu, Tun-Hsiang (Edward)

IBSAL is a dynamic simulation model of the connections existing between feedstock producers, biorefinery locations and the requisite storage and distribution systems. The model is primarily focused on the front end of the biofuels supply chain at the local level. The local data sources that are inputs include field area, dry matter, production equipment, soil and biomass moisture, weather conditions, transportation networks and associated costs. The model was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
This model can be downloaded from
www.biomass.ubc.ca

Contact Phone
Keywords
Contact Email
sokhansanjs@ornl.gov
Data Source
www.biomass.ubc.ca
Contact Person
Shahab Sokhansanj
Author(s)
Shahab Sokhansanj
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