Skip to main content

DOE

This dataset includes longitudinal measurements of water quality in four streams and rivers across the United States that were collected using the AquaBOT, an unmanned surface vehicle equipped with water quality sensors developed as part of a BETO-funded project ('Spatially resolved measurements of water quality indicators within a bioenergy landscape'). Measured water quality indicators include: nitrate concentration, temperature, specific conductivity, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, chlorophyll, and pH. The data can be found in the Excel file and details on the sampling sites, measurement methods, and data are available in the data guide.

These data are associated with the following paper:
Griffiths, N.A., P.S. Levi, J.S. Riggs, C.R. DeRolph, A.M. Fortner, and J.K. Richards. A sensor-equipped unmanned surface vehicle for high-resolution mapping of water quality in streams. Environmental Science & Technology Water. doi: 10.1021/acsestwater.1c00342

Contact Phone
Publication Year
Project Title
Spatially resolved measurements of water quality indicators within a bioenergy landscape
Organization
Lab
Contact Email
griffithsna@ornl.gov
Contact Person
Natalie Griffiths
Contact Organization
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Bioenergy Category
Author(s)
Natalie A. Griffiths, Peter S. Levi, Jeffery S. Riggs, Christopher R. DeRolph, Allison M. Fortner, Jason K. Richards
WBS Project Number
4.2.2.44

Simulations under this dataset were targeted to a specific fuelshed in Iowa.
Integrated land management (ILM) applications were targeted under this research, although the results of these simulations are at the county level; downscaling post-processing will be applied.

Keywords
Usage Policy
Please use the citation
Publication Year
Organization
Lab
DOI
10.11578/1797943
Data Source
Budgets are consistent with BT16 (DOE 2016)
Author(s)
Maggie R. Davis
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Short Rotation Woody Crop Production Scenarios Simulated for Idaho National Laboratory-ORNL Collaborations, June 2021.

Contact Phone
Usage Policy
Please use the citation
Publication Year
Organization
Lab
Contact Email
davismr@ornl.gov
DOI
10.11578/1797939
Data Source
Budgets are consistent with BT16 (DOE 2016) and Pine/Poplar allocation used the highest yield for those crops from https://public.tableau.com/app/profile/eatonlm/viz/SGI_yields/PotentialYieldOverview
Contact Person
Maggie Davis
Contact Organization
Oak Ridge National Lab
Author(s)
Maggie R. Davis

This workshop examines the potential benefits, feasibility, and barriers to the use of biofuels in place of heavy fuel oil (HFO) and marine gas oil for marine vessels. More than 90% of world’s shipped goods
travel by marine cargo vessels powered by internal combustion (diesel) engines using primarily low-cost residual HFO, which is high in sulfur content. Recognizing that marine shipping is the largest source of
anthropogenic sulfur emissions and is a significant source of other pollutants including particulates, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide (CO2), the International Maritime Organization enacted regulations to
lower the fuel sulfur content from 3.5 wt.% to 0.5 wt.% in 2020. These regulations require ship operators either to use higher-cost, low-sulfur HFO or to seek other alternatives for reducing sulfur emissions (i.e.,
scrubbers, natural gas, distillates, and/or biofuels). The near-term options for shipowners to comply with regulations include fueling with low-sulfur HFO or distillate fuels or installing emissions control systems.
However, few refineries are equipped to produce low-sulfur HFO. Likewise, the current production rates of distillates do not allow the necessary expansion required to fuel the world fleet of shipping vessels
(which consume around 330 million metric tons). This quantity is more than twice that used in the United States for cars and trucks. The other near-term option is to install emission control systems, which also
requires a significant investment. All of these options significantly increase operational costs. Because of such costs, biofuels have become an attractive alternative since they are inherently low in sulfur and
potentially also offer greenhouse gas benefits. Based on this preliminary assessment, replacing HFO in large marine vessels with minimally processed, heavy biofuels appears to have potential as a path to
reduced emissions of sulfur, CO2, and criteria emissions. Realizing this opportunity will require deeper knowledge of (1) the combustion characteristics of biofuels in marine applications, (2) their compatibility
for blending with conventional marine fuels (including HFO), (3) needs and costs for scaling up production and use, and (4) a systems assessment of their life cycle environmental impacts and costs. It is
recommended that a research program investigating each of these aspects be undertaken to better assess the efficacy of biofuels for marine use.

Keywords
Publication Year
Organization
Lab
Bioenergy Category
Author(s)
Mike Kass , Zia Abdullah , Mary Biddy , Corinne Drennan , Troy Hawkins , Susanne Jones , Johnathan Holladay , Dough Longman , Emily Newes , Tim Theiss , Tom Thompson , Michael Wang
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Contact information about the submitter of this metadata record:
Author list: Maggie Davis, Matt Langholtz, Laurence Eaton, Chad Hellwinkel
Who should be contacted with questions relating to the data? (Principal investigator or primary developer of data product): Maggie Davis, davismr@ornl.gov

What format is your data presented in? .csv .xls
Date data created 1/26-29/2016
Please include a description of the data set (abstract):
As part of the Billion Ton resource assessment projections created in 2016 (see https://www.energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2016/12/f34/2016_billion_ton_re…), this dataset was produced and titled a "base-case" scenario. This broader dataset provided an updated assessment of the potential economic availability of biomass resources from agricultural lands reported at the farmgate under conservative assumptions. Crop residues quantified in this dataset include corn stover, cereal (wheat, oats, and barley) straws, and sorghum stubble. We have isolated corn stover in this dataset.

What is the purpose of the data set? Why were the data collected?*
Per request for use in subsequent research, we have isolated corn stover in 2019 from the broader base-case projections and have provided tillage classification details from this projection. Tillage classification assumptions in this scenario allow a moderate deviation from a baseline situation (using historic CTIC data on tillage type used in counties for each crop). This dataset allowed moderate flexibility of farmers to put land into another tillage type (no till, conservation till, and reduced till) where a higher net present value was calculated.

Were data created or processed with a model or other analytical tool? Yes
Version POLYSYS v10_1-22-16b
Assumptions: Cumulative (energy crops and residues). Base-case (1% yield growth scenario), Tillage Flex = 1, across offered prices of $40-$60 in $5 increments from 2015 to 2040.

Should other organizations/individuals get credit for support, funding, or data collection and analysis? Yes, the USDOE BioEnergy Technologies Office (BETO) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

Contact Phone
Publication Year
Organization
Lab
Contact Email
davismr@ornl.gov
DOI
10.11578/1632327
Contact Person
Maggie R. Davis
Contact Organization
ORNL
Bioenergy Category
Author(s)
Maggie Davis , Matt Langholtz , Laurence Eaton , Chad Hellwinkel
Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

Perennial grasses are touted as sustainable feedstocks for energy production. Such benefits, however, may be offset if excessive nitrogen (N) fertilization leads to economic and environmental issues. Furthermore, as yields respond to changes in climate, nutrient requirements will change, and thus guidance on minimal N inputs is necessary to ensure sustainable bioenergy production. Here, a pairwise meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of N fertilization (amount and duration) and climate on the above-ground biomass yields of miscanthus (Miscanthus x giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). Both regression models and meta-analyses showed that switchgrass was more responsive to N than miscanthus, although both showed significant and positive N effects. Meta-analysis further showed that the positive growth response of miscanthus to N application increased with N addition rates of 60–300 kg N ha−1 year−1, but the magnitude of the response decreased with the number of years of fertilization (duration). N effects on switchgrass biomass increased and peaked at rates of 120–160 kg N ha−1 year−1 and 5–6 years of N inputs, but diminished for rates >300 kg N ha−1 year−1 and >7 years. Meta-analysis further revealed that the influences of N on switchgrass increased with both mean annual temperature and precipitation. Miscanthus yields were less responsive to climate than switchgrass yields. This meta-analysis helps fill a gap in estimation of biofeedstock yields based on N fertilization and could help better estimate minimum N requirements and soil management strategies for miscanthus and switchgrass cultivation across climatic conditions, thereby improving the efficiency and sustainability of bioenergy cropping systems.

    Publication Year
    Organization
    Lab
    DOI
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rser.2019.03.037
    Contact Person
    Huaihai Chen
    Contact Organization
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Bioenergy Category
    Author(s)
    Huaihai Chen , Zhongmin Dai , Henriette I. Jager , Stan D. Wullschleger , Jianming Xu , Christopher W. Schadt
    Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

    Sustainable production of algae will depend on understanding trade-offs at the energy-water nexus. Algal biofuels promise to improve the environmental sustainability profile of renewable energy along most dimensions. In this assessment of potential US freshwater production, we assumed sustainable production along the carbon dimension by simulating placement of open ponds away from high-carbon-stock lands (forest, grassland, and wetland) and near sources of waste CO 2 . Along the water dimension, we quantified trade-offs between water scarcity and production for an ‘upstream’ indicator (measuring minimum water supply) and a ‘downstream’ indicator (measuring impacts on rivers). For the upstream indicator, we developed a visualization tool to evaluate algae production for different thresholds for water surplus. We hypothesized that maintaining a minimum seasonal water surplus would also protect river habitat for aquatic biota. Our study confirmed that ensuring surplus water also reduced the duration of low-flow events, but only above a threshold. We also observed a trade-off between algal production and the duration of low-flow events in streams. These results can help to guide the choice of basin-specific sustainability targets to avoid conflicts with competing water users at this energy-water nexus. Where conflicts emerge, alternative water sources or enclosed photobioreactors may be needed for algae cultivation.

    Publication Year
    Organization
    Lab
    DOI
    https://doi.org/10.3390/w11040836
    Contact Person
    Henriette I. Jager
    Contact Organization
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Bioenergy Category
    Author(s)
    Henriette I. Jager , Rebecca A. Efroymson , Latha M. Baskaran
    Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

    Practicing agriculture decreases downstream water quality when compared to non-agricultural lands. Agricultural watersheds that also grow perennial biofuel feedstocks can be designed to improve water quality compared to agricultural watersheds without perennials. The question then becomes which conservation practices should be employed and where in the landscape should they be situated to achieve water quality objectives when growing biofuel feedstocks. In this review, we focused on four types of spatial decisions in a bioenergy landscape: decisions about placement of vegetated strips, artificial drainage, wetlands, and residue removal. The appropriate tools for addressing spatial design questions are optimizations that seek to minimize losses of sediment and nutrients, reduce water temperature, and maximize farmer income. To accomplish these objectives through placing conservation practices, both field-scale and watershed-scale cost and benefits should be considered, as many biophysical processes are scale dependent. We developed decision trees that consider water quality objectives and landscape characteristics when determining the optimal locations of management practices. These decision trees summarize various rules for placing practices and can be used by farmers and others growing biofuels. Additionally, we examined interactions between conservation practices applied to bioenergy landscapes to highlight synergistic effects and to comprehensively address the question of conservation practice usage and placement. We found that combining conservation practices and accounting for their interactive effects can significantly improve water quality outcomes. Based on our review, we determine that by making spatial decisions on conservation practices, bioenergy landscapes can be designed to improve water quality and enhance other ecosystem services.

      Publication Year
      Organization
      Lab
      Contact Email
      jkreig@vols.utk.edu
      DOI
      https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2019.105327
      Contact Person
      Jasmine A.F. Kreig
      Contact Organization
      University of Tennessee
      Bioenergy Category
      Author(s)
      Jasmine A.F. Kreig , Herbert Ssegane , Indrajeet Chaubey , Maria C. Negri , Henriette I. Jager
      Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.

      The economic potential for Eucalyptus spp. production for jet fuel additives in the United States: A 20 year projection suite of scenarios ranging from $110 Mg-1 to $220 Mg-1 utilizing the POLYSYS model.

      Contact Phone
      Publication Year
      Project Title
      The economic potential for Eucalyptus spp. production for jet fuel additives in the United States
      Organization
      Lab
      Contact Email
      davismr@ornl.gov
      Contact Person
      Maggie R. Davis
      Contact Organization
      ORNL
      Author(s)
      Maggie R. Davis

      Logging and mill residues are currently the largest sources of woody biomass for bioenergy in the US, but short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) are expected to become a larger contributor to biomass production, primarily on lands marginal for food production. However, there are very few studies on the environmental effects of SRWCs, and most have been conducted at stand rather than at watershed scales. In this manuscript, we review the potential environmental effects of SRWCs relative to current forestry or agricultural practices and best management practices (BMPs) in the southeast US and identify priorities and constraints for monitoring and modeling these effects. Plot-scale field studies and a watershed-scale modeling study found improved water quality with SRWCs compared to agricultural crops. Further, a recent watershed-scale experiment suggests that conventional forestry BMPs are sufficient to protect water quality from SRWC silvicultural activities, but the duration of these studies is short with respect to travel times of groundwater transporting nitrate to streams. While the effects of SRWC production on carbon (C) and water budgets depend on both soil properties and previous land management, woody crops will typically sequester more C when compared with agricultural crops. The overall C offset by SRWCs will depend on a variety of management practices, the number of rotations, and climate. Effects of SRWCs on biodiversity, especially aquatic organisms, are not well studied, but a meta-analysis found that bird and mammal biodiversity is lower in SRWC stands than unmanaged forests. Long-term (i.e., over multiple rotations) water quality, water use, C dynamics, and soil quality studies are needed, as are larger-scale (i.e., landscape scale) biodiversity studies, to evaluate the potential effects of SRWC production. Such research should couple field measurement and modeling approaches due to the temporal (i.e., multiple rotations) and spatial (i.e., heterogeneous landscape) scaling issues involved with SRWC production.

      Contact Phone
      Publication Year
      Project Title
      Short-rotation woody biomass sustainability
      Organization
      Lab
      Contact Email
      griffithsna@ornl.gov
      DOI
      10.1111/gcbb.12536
      Contact Person
      Natalie Griffiths
      Contact Organization
      Oak Ridge National Laboratory
      Bioenergy Category
      Author(s)
      Natalie A. Griffiths , Benjamin M. Rau , Kellie B. Vache , Gregory Starr , Menberu M. Bitew , Doug P. Aubrey , James A. Martin , Elizabeth Benton , C. Rhett Jackson
      WBS Project Number
      4.2.2.41
      Funded from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office.
      Subscribe to DOE